2017 US Nationals Field Guide: Junior Ice Dance

The 9th-best American dance team is better than most countries’ 2nd-best team. Enjoy your ice dance golden age, America.

It’s part 3 of my comprehensive Nationals field guide series, and I’m still at the point where I think I’m going to get all of these done before the competition starts. (Shut up; I’m cute when I’m ambitious.) If you’re just joining me now, take a minute to check out my overly enthusiastic Junior Men’s Field Guide and, especially, my Junior Ladies’ Field Guide, which explains the four-point rating system I’m using to loosely predict how each skater will rank. My purpose here is to highlight every athlete in the event, from the big names to those who just barely qualified, so that when you watch next week, you know who everyone is. Sometimes we forget, watching the skaters at the low end of the standings, how hard it is to put in the hours and pass the skills tests necessary to compete as a junior or senior at a National Figure Skating Championships in a talent-rich country like the United States.

In ice dance – this year and most years – if you have a partner, a set of programs, and the ability to complete a set of twizzles without dying, you’ll get to Nationals. But implicitly, the bar is a bit higher than that, since America’s top contenders in junior dance are among the best in the world. The less accomplished teams might not be anywhere close to the same level of difficulty and performance quality as the medalists – in fact, their combined scores probably won’t reach the scores that McNamara & Carpenter or Parsons & Parsons earn in the free dance alone – but the 9th-best American dance team is better than most countries’ 2nd-best team. Enjoy your ice dance golden age, America.

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